Inula Royleana
Midwest Gardening
White Ash

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Fraxinus Americana White AshFraxinus americana white ash tree

  • Zones: 3-9
  • Sun:  Full sun
  • Height:  60-70’
  • Spread:  60-70’
  • Shape:  Oval crown when young, becoming rounded as it matures
  • Growth Rate:  Very slow when young, rapid once well established
  • Soil Preference:  Prefers moist, deeply fertile soil, adaptable
  • Moisture:  Average moisture needs
  • Foliage:  Dark green with a lighter underside
  • Blooms:  Inconspicuous green flowers with purple without petals on male and female trees in late April
  • Fruit:  Large quantities of 1 - 2” narrow samaras on female treesFraxinus americana white ash fall color

White Ash is also known as the Biltmore Ash.  White ash develops lovely upright and spreading branches that are evenly distributed through the crown on a strong central leader.  This is ideal structure to produce a strong tree with little or no pruning needs.  The light gray diamond furrowed bark of the trunk is somewhat attractive.  For best growth the White Ash prefers a moist fertile soil but is very tolerant of clay and poorly drained soil.  It is ash seedsnot in the least fussy about the pH. It is an excellent choice for a shade tree in difficult sites. A tap root develops with lateral roots growing downward, ideal for street trees. However the tree is not very tolerant of air pollution, and so performs best in suburban rather than urban environments. There are both male and female trees, the female producing huge quantities of seed which readily produce seedlings.  The largest seed crops are formed about every three years, often seed production beginning when the tree is very young.  Seedless cultivars are generally male clones.  Fall color can be quite showy with some specimens displaying yellow followed by orange or red and finally purple or burgundy.  Susceptible to the Emerald Ash Borer.

 

Fraxinus Americana Autumn Applause AshFraxinus americana white ash autumn applause by Josh Jackson

  • Zones: 4b-9
  • Sun:  Full sun
  • Height:  40-50’
  • Spread:  25-30’
  • Shape:  Rounded crown
  • Growth Rate:  Rapid when young, moderate as it matures
  • Soil Preference:  Prefers moist, deeply fertile soil
  • Moisture:  Average moisture needs
  • Foliage:  Dark green turning yellow to red purple in fall
  • Blooms:  Inconspicuous green flowers with purple without petals
  • Fruit:  Seedless male

Autumn Applause Ash forms a nicely rounded dense crown atop a straight trunk, making an excellent specimen or boulevard tree.  Like the common White Ash, the excellent branching give it a strong structure.  However it may be more prone to developing large surface roots than the common ash.  Deep red fall color is excellent, developing best color in full sun.  Autumn Applause is fairly adaptable to sand or clay, acid or alkaline, and will tolerate occasional wet soil or short drought periods.  It does have a high tolerance to aerosol salt.

 

Fraxinus Americana Autumn Purple Ash ‘Junginger’ Autumn Purple Ash 'Junginger'

  • Zones: 4-9
  • Sun:  Full sun
  • Height:  50-60’
  • Spread:  45-55’
  • Shape:  Rounded crown
  • Growth Rate:  Rapid, up to 2’ per year
  • Soil Preference:  Prefers moist, deeply fertile soil
  • Moisture:  Average moisture needs
  • Foliage:  Dark green turning red purple in fall
  • Blooms:  Inconspicuous green flowers with purple without petals
  • Fruit:  Seedless maleFraxinus americana 'Autumn Purple' Ash leaves

Autumn Purple Ash has become a very popular seedless variety of White Ash.  Best fall color is achieved in full sun, holding the color for up to 4 weeks.  Make sure Autumn Purple Ash receives adequate moisture when young.  Once it is well established watering is generally unnecessary.  The trunk bark may be susceptible to splitting when young, providing opportunity for the Emerald Ash Borer.  Wrap the trunk when young, particularly in winter.

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