Inula Royleana
Midwest Gardening
Large Evergreen Shrubs

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Large evergreen shrubs are about 6 or more feet high

NOTE:  Retailers often list size of a ten year old plant.  Since many evergreens live 35-50 years plants will usually exceed their listed size

Granular fertilizer is recommended for evergreens since it releases slowly into the soil, benefiting your plant for 1 to 3 months.  Care must be taken not to sprinkle the fertilizer on the foliage.  Sprinkle directly onto the soil around and under the plant.  If it is not possible to avoid the foliage, a liquid fertilizer may be a better choice.  Liquid fertilizer is faster acting and available to your plant for 2 - 4 weeks.

 

Chamaecyparis pisifera ‘Filifera Aurea’

  • Conifer Family:  Cupressaceae
  • Mature Height:  6-20 feet
  • Mature Width:  3-7 feet
  • Growth Rate: Slow
  • Light Requirements:  Full sun to part shade
  • Water Requirements:  Medium water requirements, water weekly or more in hot dry periods.
  • Soil Preference:  Average well drained soil, prefers fertile moist soil but will tolerate short dry periods.  Will not tolerate highly alkaline soil.
  • Foliage:  Golden thread like foliage in flat sprays
  • Cone or Berry:  Small cones may develop on mature plants.
  • Disease and Insects:  No notable problems, may be somewhat susceptible to juniper blight, root rot if soil is too heavy and moist, or bagworms in warm humid climates.
  • Pest Resistance: 
  • Fertilize:  Use a 6-12-12 or 10-10-10 fertilizer in early spring
  • Spacing:  Plant 7 or more feet apart.
  • Hardiness:  Zones 4-8
Chamaecyparis pisifera 'filifera' aurea

‘Filifera Aurea’ is a semi dwarf evergreen that grows in a broad cone or haystack form.  Golden thread like weeping foliage provides color and texture year round to your gardens and landscape.  Best color is achieved in full sun, but should be protected from afternoon sun in winter to prevent sunscald.  Will tolerate mild saline problems.  Wonderful as a specimen plant or anchoring a shrub border, also a colorful foundation planting where you need a little height and interest.  Find a planting site that is protected from wind for best results.   ‘Filifera Aurea’ grows slowly and can reach 6-7 feet in 20 years, but can fully mature at 20 feet in ideal conditions.  Small cones may develop on mature plants.  Under ideal conditions, expect this evergreen to live 60 years or more.

 

Chamaecyparis thyoides ‘Heather Bun’  Heather Bun White Cedar / Heather Bun Atlantic White Cedar / White Cedar False Cypress ‘Heather Bun’

  • Conifer Family:  Cupressaceae
  • Mature Height:  6-10 feet
  • Mature Width:  4-7 feet
  • Growth Rate:  Moderate, 4” per year.
  • Light Requirements:  Full Sun to part shade
  • Water Requirements:  Requires weekly watering, more in extreme heat.
  • Soil Preference:  Average, moist but well drained soil.  Prefers a fertile peat-sand with acidic pH.
  • Foliage:  Feathery foliage of olive green with plum overtones, turning intense plum in winter.
  • Cone or Berry: 
  • Disease and Insects:  No significant problems.
  • Pest Resistance:  Somewhat deer resistant, but they may nibble.
  • Fertilize:  Use a 6-12-12 or 10-10-10 fertilizer in early spring
  • Spacing:  Plant 7 or more feet apart.
  • Hardiness:  Zones 5-8. May be hardy to zone 4 with winter protection.
'Heatherbun' Chamaecyparis thyoides
heather bun winter color

‘Heatherbun’ is a rounded semi dwarf with blue green to olive soft foliage, turning to a heathery plum in winter. Young form is globular but matures to a pyramidal form.   ‘Heatherbun’ performs best in full sun and should be sheltered from strong wind and afternoon winter sun in the north.  This “fuzzy” looking evergreen adds unusual color and texture to your landscape or garden.  It is a nice alternative for foundation plantings and shrub borders and is a great specimen or accent plant.  Can be sheared lightly in fall to maintain form or size.  ‘Heather Bun’ can be expected to live for 50 years or more in ideal conditions.  You will find ‘Heather Bun’ advertised to reach only 30” x 30” and maintains a rounded “bun” form - the only way that will happen is if you prune it every fall.  In ten years it will be 3-4 feet tall.

 

Pinus strobus ‘Nana’  Dwarf Eastern White Pine

  • Conifer Family:  Pinaceae
  • Mature Height:  3-7 feet
  • Mature Width:  6-12 feet
  • Growth Rate:  Slow, 2” per year
  • Light Requirements:  Full Sun
  • Water Requirements: Requires weekly watering, more in periods of  extreme heat
  • Soil Preference:  Prefers a fertile, moist but well drained soil.  Will not tolerate heavy clay and prefers a neutral to acidic soil
  • Foliage:  Silvery blue to green soft needles.
  • Cone or Berry: 
  • Disease and Insects: 
  • Pest Resistance:  Deer resistant
  • Fertilize:  Use a 6-12-12 or 10-10-10 fertilizer in early spring
  • Spacing:  Plant 5 or more feet apart.
  • Hardiness:  Zones 3-9
Dwarf Eastern White Pine by Gerald Figal

Dwarf Eastern White Pine ‘Nana’ is a dwarf relative to it’s large sized genus.  It is a dense bushy evergreen shrub with an irregular branching habit.  A flat topped, mounded form is maintained throughout its’ life.  Dwarf Eastern White Pine is a great choice where a larger accent plant is needed, as an anchor in a shrub border with ornamental trees, or as a barrier to woodlands when planted 5-8 feet apart in a mass.  This slow growing evergreen will grow to about 3 feet high and 3 feet wide in ten years.  At full maturity in ideal conditions, it could grow as high as 10 feet.  Should be sheltered from strong winds and is not tolerant of urban pollution or salt spray.  In alkaline soils Dwarf Eastern White Pine will suffer yellowing of the needles.  The cultivar name ‘Nana’ is a loose reference to the term dwarf, so caution when selecting a cultivar is advised.  Named cultivars may have more consistent and reliable characteristics, for example:  ‘Nana Improved’ is actually larger, ‘Blue Shag’ is a smaller rounded dwarf, ‘Elkins’ variety is a smaller dwarf, ‘UConn ‘is a larger upright conical.

 

Tsuga canadensis ‘Pendula’  Weeping Canadian Hemlock

  • Conifer Family:  Pinaceae
  • Mature Height:  5-15 feet
  • Mature Width:  8-10 feet
  • Growth Rate:  Moderate
  • Light Requirements:  Part shade to full sun.
  • Water Requirements:  Medium water requirements, must be watered in dry periods.  It may not survive prolonged drought without supplemental water.
  • Soil Preference:  Prefers a rich well drained soil, but will adapt to average soil.  Prefers neutral to slightly acidic.  Will not tolerate salt.
  • Foliage:  Dark green 1/2” needles.
  • Cone or Berry:  3/4” light brown cones may appear on mature plants.
  • Disease and Insects:  In proper conditions ‘Pendula’ is trouble free.  Can be susceptible to blight, canker and rust, bagworms, borers, miners and mites.  In the Northeast the wooly adelgid aphid is a problem.
  • Pest Resistance:  Deer resistant
  • Fertilize:  Use a 6-12-12 or 10-10-10 fertilizer in early spring.  Granular fertilizer should not come in contact with foliage, stems or trunks.
  • Spacing:  Plant 12 or more feet apart.
  • Hardiness:  Zones 3-7
'Pendula' Weeping Canadian Hemlock

Weeping Canadian Hemlock prefers cool, moist and humid conditions and will not tolerate drought.  Select a planting site that is sheltered from strong winds.  ‘Pendula’ can be sensitive to fall transplanting, care should be taken to properly prepare hole ahead of time so that exposure is limited.  Will not tolerate urban conditions, pollution or road salt.  The central trunk will need staking to encourage a strong upright form.  If left unpruned, ‘Pendula’ may get as tall as 10-15 feet when fully mature, ultimate height will depend on how long it is staked.  In ten years should be about 5 feet tall.  Consistently pruned, a 3 foot weeping mound can be maintained.  A weeping evergreen is an excellent specimen plant, providing unique interest all year round.  Good screening plant when used in groups - plant 10 feet apart and sheltered from strong wind.  Stunning along side a water feature.   Use caution when selecting a ‘Pendula’ weeping hemlock, as the term ‘Pendula’ is often used generically.  ‘Sargentii’ is frequently sold as ‘Pendula’.  The greatest difference appears to be the growth training in the nursery but ‘Sargentii’ can get quite a bit larger.  ‘Sargentii’ is allowed to sprawl, ‘Pendula’ should be trained to grow upright and may need continued staking.

 

Tsuga canadensis ‘Sargentii’  Weeping Canadian Hemlock / Weeping Eastern Hemlock

  • Conifer Family:  Pinaceae
  • Mature Height:  10-12 feet
  • Mature Width:  20-30 feet
  • Growth Rate:  Slow, 12-24” per year.
  • Light Requirements:  Full sun to part shade, quite shade tolerant.
  • Water Requirements:  Medium water requirements, must be watered in dry periods.  It may not survive prolonged drought without supplemental water.
  • Soil Preference:  Prefers a rich well drained soil, will adapt to average soil. Will not tolerate salt.  Prefers slightly neutral to acidic soil.
  • Foliage:  Soft green fragrant needles
  • Cone or Berry:  3/4” brown cones
  • Disease and Insects:  In proper conditions ‘Pendula’ is trouble free.  Can be susceptible to blight, canker and rust, bagworms, borers, miners and mites.  In the Northeast the wooly adelgid aphid is a problem.
  • Pest Resistance:  Deer resistant. 
  • Fertilize:  Use a 6-12-12 or 10-10-10 fertilizer in early spring.  Granular fertilizer should not come in contact with foliage, stems or trunks.
  • Spacing:  Plant more than 30 feet apart.
  • Hardiness:  Zones 4 to 7
'Sargentii' Canadian Hemlock

‘Sargentii’ is a beautiful weeping evergreen with soft green needles.  The branches gently arch to the ground.  If trained to grow upright initially until it is several feet tall it will gracefully spread to twice as wide.  Over the years several layers of branches develop forming a circular mound.  The flexible branches resist breakage under the weight of heavy snow in the north.  Select a wide open planting site that is protected from strong winds.  Will not tolerate urban conditions, pollution or road salt.  ‘Sargentii’ is a stunning specimen when allowed plenty of room and is very dramatic near a water feature.  In ten years, unstaked, it will reach about 5 feet tall with a wide spread.  In 80 years it can reach a height of 12 feet tall and 25 feet wide. 

 

Abies lasiocarpa ‘Glauca Compacta’

  • Conifer Family:  Pinacea
  • Mature Height:  6-8 feet, in ideal conditions perhaps 15 feet tall well into its lifespan
  • Mature Width:  4-6 feet
  • Growth Rate:  Slow, 1-3” per year
  • Light Requirements:  Full sun
  • Water Requirements:  Regular weekly watering is required, more often in extreme heat
  • Soil Preference:  Prefers a slightly acidic soil, well drained.
  • Foliage:  Distinctive blue, soft needles
  • Cone or Berry:  At maturity may develop bluish purple upright cones near the top of the tree.
  • Disease and Insects:  May be susceptible to bagworms, aphids, bark beetles, rust and fungi.
  • Pest Resistance:  Deer resistant
  • Fertilize:  Use a 6-12-12 or 10-10-10 fertilizer in early spring
  • Spacing:  6 feet apart
  • Hardiness:  Zones 3-7
Abies lasiocarpa 'Glauca compacta'

‘Glauca compacta’ is a dwarf relative to its full size form which can reach 100 feet or more.  But ‘Glauca compacta’ reaches a manageable 6-8 feet tall.  It is slow growing and in ten years time reaches 3 or 4 feet tall, with a dense, strongly pyramid form.  The horizontal branches are tiered.  Dramatic blue needles are actually soft to the touch, and hold a good blue year round.  It prefers the cooler climates and may benefit from afternoon shade in hotter regions.  Best blue color is realized in full sun.  Performs very well in the Northwest and at high altitudes, may have some difficulty in the Midwest.  May also be known as ‘Arizonica compacta’, or is very similar, and may be grafted to Abies nordmanniana or Abies concolor root stock.  It may also be referred to as Rocky Mountain fir or Corkbark fir, as the bark is a distinctive chalky gray.  This is an excellent specimen plant either in a foundation planting, shrub border or rock garden.

 

Abies koreana ‘Aurea’ Golden Korean Fir

  • Conifer Family:  Pinaceae
  • Mature Height:  20 feet
  • Mature Width:  5-13 feet
  • Growth Rate:  Slow, 3-6” per year
  • Light Requirements:  Full Sun to Part Shade.  Will benefit from afternoon shade in hot regions.
  • Water Requirements:  Average water requirements, do not overwater
  • Soil Preference:  Well drained, prefers somewhat sandy soil but not overly fussy
  • Foliage:  Deep golden yellow
  • Cone or Berry:  Purple cones from late summer into winter on mature plants
  • Disease and Insects:  Good resistance to disease and insects
  • Pest Resistance: 
  • Fertilize:  Use a 6-12-12 or 10-10-10 fertilizer in early spring
  • Spacing:  6-13 feet apart
  • Hardiness:  Zones 5-8
Abies koreana Aurea by Magnolia 100
Abies koreana 'Aurea' cones by thegardenbuzz

Slow growing ‘Aurea’ will reach about 6 feet in 10 years, but eventually grows to 20 feet tall.  New growth is golden yellow and matures to a deep gold.  Best color will develop in cooler climates where ‘Aurea’ can be planted in full sun.  On mature trees, pink cones that mature to an eye catching purple form toward the top of the tree.  When young ‘Aurea’ may have a broad, nearly horizontal form, eventually forming a central leader.  Growth becomes upright in form with irregular branching.  Not suited to inner city or street plantings as ‘Aurea’ is intolerant of urban pollution.  Mulch the root zone for winter in cold regions.  Certain nurseries indicated hardiness to zones 3 and 4, not sure how they really fare but would suggest that survival is doubtful in zone 3.  This dwarf fir is often grafted to Abies nordmanniana rootstock.  ‘Aurea’ is an excellent specimen plant for a smaller property.  Will tolerate pruning, but best left unpruned unless you are top pruning to maintain a low spreading plant.  Can be expected to live 60 years or more.

 

Chamaecyparis pisifera ‘Boulevard’  Boulevard False Cypress/Blue Moss Cypress

  • Conifer Family:  Cupressaceae
  • Mature Height:  6-12 feet
  • Mature Width:  3-4 feet
  • Growth Rate:  Slow
  • Light Requirements:  Sun to part shade
  • Water Requirements:  Average water requirements, but do not allow it to dry out.
  • Soil Preference:  Moist well drained average soil with neutral to slightly acidic pH, avoid wet poorly drained soil
  • Foliage:  Silvery blue-green
  • Cone or Berry:  None
  • Disease and Insects:  Somewhat susceptible to juniper blight and bagworms.
  • Pest Resistance: 
  • Fertilize:  Use a 6-12-12 or 10-10-10 slow release fertilizer in early spring
  • Spacing:  6 feet apart
  • Hardiness:  Zones 4-8
Chamaecyparis pisifera 'Boulevard' foliage
Chamaecyparis pisifera 'Boulevard'

‘Boulevard’ is a semi-dwarf sport of ‘Squarrosa’.  It grows in an upright pyramid with a symmetrical broad form.  Foliage is a unique silver blue in tight clusters of soft short needles.  The needles are quite different from other Chamaecyparis, they are awl-shaped and curving with pointed tips, but soft to the touch.  Interior needles die off, and unfortunately the brown needles may be visiible.  When the shrub is small enough the dead needles can be stripped off with a gloved hand.  Nevertheless, ‘Boulevard’ is a nice contrast to other evergreens with its silvery blue color and unique bunchy clusters.  Foliage will appear more blue in soil that is acidic and with high magnesium levels.  It does very well in the Pacific Northwest region and is quite tolerant of urban conditions and pollution.   In ten years time it will reach 5 to 6 feet tall, eventually reaching up to 15 feet.  A smaller size can be maintained by regular pruning.  Avoid wet heavy soil as ‘Boulevard’ is susceptible to root rot.  Should be planted in a site protected from strong winds, winter winds will cause foliage to bronze.  ‘Boulevard’ is a wonderful specimen plant or vertical accent to a shrub border.  Will also serve well as a corner anchor in a foundation planting.  May also be known as ‘Cyano-viridis’.  Can be expected to live 60 years or more.

 

Chamaecyparis pisifera ‘Baby Blue’

  • Conifer Family:  Cupressaceae
  • Mature Height:  4-6 feet
  • Mature Width:  4 feet
  • Growth Rate:  Slow, 3-5” per year
  • Light Requirements:  Part to full sun, preferring part shade
  • Water Requirements:  Water weekly, more often in extreme heat.  Do not allow to dry out.
  • Soil Preference:  Moist but well drained and fertile soil, slightly acidic.  Fairly adaptable but avoid wet soil.
  • Foliage:  Silvery blue, fine textured
  • Cone or Berry:  None
  • Disease and Insects:  Slightly susceptible to juniper blight and root rot
  • Pest Resistance:  Deer resistant
  • Fertilize:  Use a 6-12-12 or 10-10-10 slow release fertilizer in early spring, or water soluble fertilizer in early spring and again in early fall.  Do not fertilize in the hot summer or just after planting.
  • Spacing:  6-8 feet apart, prefers open conditions
  • Hardiness:  Zones 4-8
Chamaecyparis pisifera, 'Baby blue'

The fine silvery blue foliage of ‘Baby Blue’ has a soft feathery look and turns a slight purplish or bronze color in winter.  This evergreen can add a unique look to your landscape with it’s bright blue needles and interesting texture.  Growth form is upright and somewhat conical, keeping a neat shape without trimming.  The dense shrub shears well if desired to maintain size.  ‘Baby Blue makes a lovely specimen or accent shrub or is a manageable mature size for foundation plantings.  The attractive and dense silver blue foliage would make a unique privacy hedge.  ‘Baby Blue’ will be 6 feet tall in 10 to 15 years, ultimately reaching about 10 feet tall and 8 feet wide.  Can be expected to live 60 years or more.  Does very well in mild western regions.  In cold regions, apply thick mulch to the root zone.

 

Picea pungens f. glauca ‘Baby Blue Eyes’ Spruce/Baby Blue Colorado Spruce

  • Conifer Family:  Pinaceae
  • Mature Height:  15-18 feet
  • Mature Width:  6-8 feet
  • Growth Rate:  Slow, 2-3” per year
  • Light Requirements:  Full sun to light shade
  • Water Requirements:  Average, will tolerate dry periods
  • Soil Preference:  Rich well drained soil, will not tolerate wet soil
  • Foliage:  Silvery blue needles that are stiff and prickly
  • Cone or Berry:  Begins producing small green cones at about 20 years
  • Disease and Insects:  Somewhat susceptible to the White pine weevil and spruce aphids.
  • Pest Resistance:  Deer resistant
  • Fertilize:  Use a 6-12-12 or 10-10-10 slow release fertilizer in early spring
  • Spacing:  8-15 feet apart
  • Hardiness:  Zones 3-8
Baby Blue Eyes Spruce

‘Baby Blue Eyes’ is a dwarf form of blue spruce.  This evergreen has an intense blue color creating a striking accent in the landscape.  Best blue color will develop in light shade.  When young ‘Baby Blue Eyes’ has a strong pyramid habit, maturing to a more broadly conical form.  If grafted it can eventually reach 30 feet tall and 15 feet wide.  Since it is sometimes grafted, the growth rate can vary based on the rootstock.  Generally the Norway Spruce rootstock allows for easier transplanting with its vigorous root system, in which case you may expect a growth rate in the range of  8-18” per year.  Specimens labeled dwarf with a mature (ten year) size less than 20 feet are likely the true dwarf on its’ own roots.  ‘Baby Blue Eyes’ tolerates urban environments and pollution very well, and handles salt well, but is not partial to continuous assault of road salt.

 

Thuja occidentalis ‘Degroot’s Spire’

  • Conifer Family:  Cupressaceae
  • Mature Height:  20-25 feet
  • Mature Width:  4-6 feet
  • Growth Rate:  Slow to moderate, 6-10 inches per year.
  • Light Requirements:  Part to full sun
  • Water Requirements:  Requires regular watering, weekly or more often in extreme heat.
  • Soil Preference:  Average to slightly sandy soil with good drainage, prefers slightly acidic.  Very adaptable, tolerating clay or moist soils..
  • Foliage:  Deep green, fine textured, fan shaped sprays on short branches.  Foliage may slightly bronze in northern winters.
  • Cone or Berry:  Insignificant
  • Disease and Insects:  Very resistant.  Only occasional problems with spider mites or bagworms.
  • Pest Resistance:  Deer and rabbits may eat the foliage.
  • Fertilize:  Use a 6-12-12 or 10-10-10 slow release fertilizer in early spring and again in early to mid autumn.
  • Spacing: 
  • Hardiness:  Zones 3-8
'DeGroot's Spire' Arborvitae Thuja

Degroot’s Spire is a very tall and narrow evergreen perfect where a small planting space is available but vertical accent is desired.  Growth form is a columnar pyramid lending a formal appearance when used in pairs, flanking an entrance or lining a drive.  The mature size of ‘Degroot’s Spire’ is somewhat difficult to determine.  You will find the size indicated anywhere from 18 inches wide and 6 feet tall up to 6 feet wide and 25 feet tall.  I have planted several from two different nurseries tagged as 18-24” wide and 6-8 feet tall.  After ten years that is about the size of all six plants, so without shearing to control size they may double in width and height after 20 or more years.  Holds a nice shape without pruning, but shears well if a neater appearance is desired.  Shear only new growth from the current season.  Excellent for a privacy screen.  A very easy care and low maintenance evergreen suited to urban landscapes.  Heavy snowfall can bend or damage branches, but being shorter branches than the American Arborvitae it is less likely.  Can be expected to live 50 years or more.

 

Picea glauca ‘Conica’ Dwarf Alberta Spruce

  • Conifer Family:  PinaceaeDwarf Alberta Spruce topiary
  • Mature Height:  10-12 feet
  • Mature Width:  3-5 feet
  • Growth Rate:  Very slow, 2-4 inches per year.
  • Light Requirements:  Full sun to part sun, best in full sun.
  • Water Requirements:  Average, do not overwater.
  • Soil Preference:  Moist, very well drained soil.  Prefers acidic soil.
  • Foliage:  Light green very thin needles, 1/2” long.
  • Cone or Berry:  Insignificant
  • Disease and Insects:  Susceptible to mites, especially in wet regions, after unusually wet periods, or when planted too close to a foundation or neighboring plants.
  • Pest Resistance: 
  • Fertilize:  Use a 6-12-12 or 10-10-10 slow release fertilizer in early spring
  • Spacing:  6-10 feet apart.  Allow for good air circulation to keep dense foliage dry.  Dwarf Alberta Spruce
  • Hardiness:  Zones 2-6

Dwarf Alberta spruce is not tolerant of urban stress, pollution, road salt spray, winter winds, dry soil, or extreme heat.  Although that may seem a bit fussy, given enough space and planted with protection from winter sun and winds (usually a northern or eastern exposure), the Dwarf Alberta Spruce is grown quite successfully without a lot of attention as a specimen plant or foundation accent.  The foliage is very very dense, so it needs some space to allow goDwarf Albert Spruce tree formod air circulation to keep the foliage dry.  The dense foliage also lends itself very well to topiary and grafted tree forms.  The pyramid form is maintained without pruning.  Occasionally reversion to the full size White Spruce may occur, which can quickly overtake the dwarf plant if allowed.  Should a larger branch or shoot with longer needles be produced, remove it completely and immediately.  The very slow growth habit makes Dwarf Alberta excellent for container planting.  In the zones 2-4 the container will have to be protected over winter.  Can be expected to live more than 50 years, reaching up to 12 feet tall by that time.

 

Thuja occidentalis ‘Emerald Green’ Emerald Green Eastern Arborvitae

  • Conifer Family:  Cupressaceae
  • Mature Height:  10-15 feet
  • Mature Width:  3-4 feet
  • Growth Rate:  Moderate, 6-12 inches per year
  • Light Requirements:  Full sun to part shade
  • Water Requirements:  Average, water weekly or more in dry periods.
  • Soil Preference:  Average soil, slightly acidic, but will tolerate alkaline soil.
  • Foliage:  Fan like sprays are bright green and soft
  • Cone or Berry:  May develop very small cones after 6 or 7 years, tiny green that turn coppery brown.
  • Disease and Insects:  Susceptible to bagworms, leaf miner and spider mites.
  • Pest Resistance:  May be browsed by deer.
  • Fertilize:  Use a 6-12-12 or 10-10-10 slow release fertilizer in early spring and again in early to mid autumn.
  • Spacing:  10 feet apart, 3-6 feet apart for screening.
  • Hardiness:  Zones 3-7
Emerald Arborvitae

The ‘Emerald Green’ evergreen commonly found in nurseries is the Smaragd Strain.  This easy to grow evergreen has bright, deep emerald foliage and maintains a nice dense pyramid form without shearing.  The foliage holds its green well through winter other than in extreme cold, where it may bronze a bit or turn yellow-brown.  Ultimately ‘Emerald Green’ may reach 30 feet tall and 8-10 feet wide.  They are commonly used for hedges, windbreaks and fast filling screening plants.  For screening or windbreak, the trees can be planted quite close together for faster coverage, they will not grow as wide when planted close.  Minimum spacing should be 3 feet apart center to center for quickest coverage, but after ten years you may need to remove as many as every other tree.  ‘Emerald Green’ also serves as a nice anchor planting at foundation corners of a two story home or to anchor a border planting.  Resists snow and ice damage if you select single leader trees.  Can be expected to live 50 years or more.

 

Chamaecyparis obtusa Hinoki False Cypress

  • Conifer Family:  Cupressaceae
  • Mature Height:  15-20 feet
  • Mature Width:  15-20 feet
  • Growth Rate:  Moderate, up to 12” per year
  • Light Requirements:  Full sun
  • Water Requirements:  Requires regular watering, prefers a humid environment.
  • Soil Preference:  Moist well drained soil, neutral to slightly acidic
  • Foliage:  Fan shaped sprays of deep green foliage with light undersides.
  • Cone or Berry:  1/2” diameter brown cones.
  • Disease and Insects:  Good resistance
  • Pest Resistance:  Good resistance
  • Fertilize:  Use a 6-12-12 or 10-10-10 slow release fertilizer in early spring
  • Spacing: 
  • Hardiness:  Zones 5-8, preferring cool and moist.
False Cypress Hinoki 'Compacta' Chameacyparis obtusa by Cliff

Hinoki False Cypress creates a graceful focal point with its’ dark and light greens with white markings on the undersides.  and feathery foliage held on slightly drooping branches.  A broad pyramid form is held with little or no pruning.  A full size species tree can reach 120 feet tall, but specimens for cultivation are generally dwarf.  Even the dwarfs may reach 50-60 feet tall, so check the tags and question the nursery staff to be sure you are getting what you expect.  There are hundreds of named cultivars, and large retailers may not specify the cultivar but typically they will carry a 15-20 foot at ten years maturity variety.  Does not tolerate pollution, salt spray or winter winds, plant in a protected location.

 

Juniperus virginiana/scopulorum ‘Blue Arrow’/’Skyrocket’

  • Conifer Family:  Cupressaceae
  • Mature Height:  12-15 feet
  • Mature Width:  2-4 feet
  • Growth Rate:  Moderate, 10-18” per year
  • Light Requirements:  Full sun
  • Water Requirements:  Drought resistant once established, adapts to either dry or moist conditions.
  • Soil Preference:  Average to sandy well drained soil, slightly acidic is ideal, but not overly fussy about soil type or pH.
  • Foliage:  Fine textured blue green, long narrow sprays on upright vertical branches.
  • Cone or Berry:  Silver blue berries
  • Disease and Insects:  In moist conditions, can be susceptible to Cedar Apple Rust, canker and Phomopsis blight.
  • Pest Resistance:  Deer resistant
  • Fertilize:  Use a 6-12-12 or 10-10-10 slow release fertilizer in early spring and again in early autumn
  • Spacing:  2-4 feet apart
  • Hardiness:  zones 4-9, will do well in zone 3 if not exposed to winter winds.
Skyrocket Juniper by TOG

It must be noted that there is a difference of opinion among nurserymen and horticulturalists regarding the varieties ‘Blue Arrow’ and ‘Skyrocket’, as well as the classification of virginiana or scopulorum.  Proper classification is likely Juniperus scopulorum, and the varieties are either one in the same or indistinguishable, although some will claim ‘Blue Arrow’ to be an improved variety to ‘Skyrocket’.  Whatever way you find them labeled, the plants are either identical or you will not know the difference.  ‘Blue Arrow’/’Skyrocket’ juniper has a tall narrow form that is excellent for small spaces or softening the corner of a structure.  It is very easy to care for where it receives full sun and occasional rain.  Partial shade is tolerated, but will reduce the density and growth rate of the plant.  In the first growing season be sure to water regularly to establish a deep root system that can handle dry period.  Very tolerant of urban pollution and can thrive in inner city areas.  Design uses are endless where its’ narrow form can punctuate statuary or structure designs, lend formality or a Mediterranean flair, flank an entrance, create a formal screen, or lend a lovely background to brightly colored shrubs or flowers.  ‘Blue Arrow’ can be expected to live 70 years or more, and ultimately reach 20 feet tall.

  • Conifer Family: 
  • Mature Height: 
  • Mature Width: 
  • Growth Rate: 
  • Light Requirements: 
  • Water Requirements: 
  • Soil Preference: 
  • Foliage: 
  • Cone or Berry: 
  • Disease and Insects: 
  • Pest Resistance: 
  • Fertilize: 
  • Spacing: 
  • Hardiness: 

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